Black History Nerds Saturday School graphic.

Black History Nerds Saturday School

Black History Nerds Saturday school is our monthly professional development series for pre-K-12 school teachers and others interested in learning more about Black history and race. These one-hour sessions aim to help develop Black history content pedagogical knowledge. Professional development credits are possible.

Upcoming Sessions

Saturday, February 11, 2023

Promotional graphic for Hands that Pick Cotton Now Pick Public Officials virtual presentation by Dr. Amanda Vickery.

Presentation Abstract

In this presentation, we will explore Black women’s geography by digging into the life and activism of civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer to learn and teach the history of Black farmers in the United States.

Virtual Presentation
Session:
“Hands that pick cotton now pick public officials”: Black women’s geography and the activism of Fannie Lou Hamer”

Feb. 11, 2023

Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

PRESENTED BY:

Dr. Amanda Vickery
Associate Professor of Social Studies Education/Race in Education
University of North Texas

Saturday, February 18, 2023

Promotional image for Brittany Jones.

Presentation Abstract

Fear has shaped events throughout U.S. history, as those who have possessed fear have weaponized this emotion to justify violence and oppression while others have used fear as an impetus for radical resistance. I aim to move fear from the periphery to the forefront by analyzing how fear is discussed in Virginia’s U.S. History Standards and Curriculum Framework. The standards only describe fear as an emotion possessed by white people, the inclusion of Black suffering does not lead to Black fear, and Black people do not fear. This work illuminates the importance of examining emotions, particularly fear, in social studies education and has implications for both K–12 teachers and teacher education.

Virtual Presentation
Session:
“Why aren't Black people allowed to fear in U.S. history?”

Feb. 18, 2023

Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

PRESENTED BY:

Brittany Jones
PhD Candidate
Michigan State University

Saturday, February 25, 2023

Promotional graphic for Dr. ArCasia James-Gallaway.

Presentation Abstract

Black oral histories are a good way to teach Black history. In this session, Dr. James-Gallaway will give an introduction to Black oral histories and then provide some robust virtual archives/resources for classroom use. Last, she will not a couple ways Black oral histories can be used in the classroom.

Virtual Presentation
Session:
“What you heard? Teaching with oral histories of Black America”

Feb. 25, 2023

Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

PRESENTED BY:

Dr. ArCasia James-Gallaway
Assistant Professor
Texas A&M University

Saturday, March 4, 2023

Promotional graphic for Dr. Ashley Farmer.

Presentation Abstract

This session addresses 3 major myths of the Civil Rights Movement, compares activism then with the Black Lives Matter Movement of today, and then talks about how people might better engage this history in their own lives.

Virtual Presentation
Session:
“Social justice in Historical Context”

March 4, 2023

Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

PRESENTED BY:

Dr. Ashley Farmer
Associate Professor
University of Texas at Austin

Past Sessions

Saturday, February 4, 2023

Promotional graphic for "From History to Destiny: What does it mean to be Black, a virtual presentation presented by Dr. Chike Akua.

Presentation Abstract

Educational research has demonstrated that culture is the key—the critical mediating factor in increasing student success for African American students. However, most African American students matriculate through systems of schooling that omit the unique culture, contributions, and accomplishments of Black people. This engaging and interactive presentation connects the legacy of past cultural excellence with strategies and methods teachers can use to produce excellence today. It provides cutting edge research and visual documentation of little-known accomplishments and contributions of African and African American people in various fields of study.

Virtual Presentation
Session:
"From History to Destiny": What does it mean to be Black

Feb. 4, 2023

Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

PRESENTED BY:

Dr. Chike Akua
Assistant Professor in
Educational Leadership
Clark Atlanta University

Saturday, January 21, 2023

Promotional graphic for a virtual presentation titled A love letter to Buffalo: #BuffaloSyllabus and Digital Scholarship.

Presentation Abstract

Within seven months, Black residents in the city of Buffalo experienced two unfortunate tragedies–a mass shooting and a winter storm. Surviving both a white supremacist attack and an environmental catastrophe, the Black community in Buffalo has been forced to reconcile with the paradox of how Black suffering and violence can coexist in a “City of Good Neighbors.” When scholar-activists J Coley, Tiana Wilson, William Jamal Richardson, and Dr. Robert Mays released the #BuffaloSyllabus, they intended to provide historical, social, political, and economic contextualization of Black Buffalo today. Described as a “Love Letter to Buffalo,” the co-creators of the syllabus intentionally designed an online platform that would permanently house accessible resources for people interested in the relationship between race, gender, class, urban planning, and environmental justice. Their talk will explore how academics can use institutional networks for public scholarship and community engagement. In their presentation, they will discuss the origin and development story of the #BuffaloSyllabus and their aspirations for the future use of this educational resource.

Virtual Presentation
Jan. 21, 2023
Session:
A Love Letter to Buffalo: #BuffaloSyllabus and Digital Scholarship
Time:
11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

PRESENTED BY:

J Coley
PhD Candidate and Graduate Instructor
in Sociology
University at Buffalo

Dr. Robert Mays
Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker

William Richardson
PhD Candidate in Sociology
Northwestern University

Tiana Wilson
PhD Candidate in History
University of Texas at Austin

 

Dr. Jarvis Givens.

The February 2022 sessions welcomed 1,505 registrations over four weeks. Beginning in fall 2022, we plan on having one session per month with four during February 2023, for a total of 10 sessions. Please check back this summer for details on our planned speakers.

Virtual Presentation
Feb. 5, 2022
Dr. Jarvis Givens,
Harvard University
Session: The Art of Black Teaching 
Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

Dr. Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz.

Virtual Presentation
Feb. 12, 2022
Dr. Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz,
Teachers College, Columbia University
Session: Historical Literacy as Racial Literacy
Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

Dr. Leonard Moore.

Virtual Presentation
Feb. 19, 2022
Dr. Leonard Moore
University of Texas at Austin
Session: Teaching Black History to White People
Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST

Dr. Gholdy Muhammad.

Virtual Presentation
Feb. 26, 2022
Dr. Gholdy Muhammad
University of Illinois at Chicago
Session: The Hill Project, a Black Studies Curriculum
Time: 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST