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Faculty Honors, Awards and Promotions

Portrait of Maureen Boyd.

Maureen Boyd

Maureen Boyd in the Department of Learning and Instruction, has been promoted to full professor.

Portrait of Steve Jacobson.

Stephen Jacobson

Stephen Jacobson UB distinguished professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, is a 2020 recipient of the Master Teacher Award for the University Council for Educational Administration.

Portrait of Heidi Julien.

Heidi Julien

Heidi Julien professor in the Department of Information Science, has been awarded the 2020 SIG-USE Outstanding Contributions to Information Behavior Research Award.

Portrait of Jaekyung Lee.

Jaekyung Lee

Jaekyung Lee professor in the Department of Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, has been selected as a Fulbright Global Scholar for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Portrait of Melinda Lemke.

Melinda Lemke

Melinda Lemke assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy has been named the co-lead of the Refugee Health and Wellbeing Team participating in the 2020-21 Big Ideas Teams Leadership by the Community for Global Health Equity.

Portrait of Amanda Nickerson.

Amanda Nickerson

Amanda Nickerson professor in the Department of Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, has won the American Psycho-logical Association’s Tom Oakland Mid-Career Scholarship Award.

Portrait of Raechele Pope.

Raechele Pope

Raechele Pope associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, received the Sawubona Award for Research & Scholarship from the American College Personnel Association’s Pan-African Network. Pope also is a Senior Scholar Diplomate with ACPA.

Portrait of Heidi Julien.

Amy Reynolds

Amy Reynolds professor in the Department of Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, has been named president-elect of the American Psychological Association’s Division 17, Society for Counseling Psychology. She also has been named full professor.

Portrait of John Strong.

John Strong

John Strong assistant professor in the Department of Learning and Instruction, has been awarded the International Literacy Association’s Timothy & Cynthia Shanahan Outstanding Dissertation Award. He also has been awarded the Reading Hall of Fame Emerging Scholars Fellowship.

Portrait of Tony Tosado.

Tony Tosado

Tony Tosado in the Department of Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, has been promoted to clinical associate professor.

Portrait of X. Christine Wang.

X. Christine Wang

X. Christine Wang in the Department of Learning and Instruction, has been promoted to full professor.

Portrait of Lois Weis.

Lois Weis

Lois Weis SUNY distinguished professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, has been elected to the Board of Directors of the National Academy of Education for a four-year term.

Portrait of Jinting Wu.

Jinting Wu

Jinting Wu assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, has been named an Early Career Fellow in the Henry Luce Foundation/American Council of Learned Societies’ Program in China Studies.

Staff Updates

Portrait of Timothy Cauller.

Timothy Cauller

Timothy Cauller has been named director of the English Language Institute.

Portrait of Lisa Monpere-Cruz.

Lisa Monpere-Cruz

Lisa Monpere-Cruz has been named a staff assistant for the English Language Institute.

Portrait of Benjamin Poremski.

Benjamin Poremski

Benjamin Poremski has been named the director of assessment and data analytics.

Portrait of Arryonna Singleton.

Arryonna Singleton

Arryonna Singleton has been named assistant to the chair in the Department of Information Science.

Portrait of Ryan Taughrin.

Ryan Taughrin

Ryan Taughrin has been named the assistant dean of enrollment management and the director of graduate admissions.

Visiting Scholar

Terri N. Watson

Portrait of Terri Watson.

“If we’re going to tackle racism, I think schools are the best place to start.”

Terri N. Watson is an associate professor in the Department of Leadership and Human Development at the City College of New York. This year she joins GSE as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar with the Center for Diversity Innovation.

Her work is informed by critical race theory and Black feminism, and her research focuses on school leadership for social justice. She aims to help transform schools into more just, caring, loving and equitable spaces as she collaborates with educators to improve the educational outcomes and life chances of historically excluded and underserved students and families.

“If we’re going to tackle racism, I think schools are the best place to start,” she said. “What are we doing now to dismantle the walls that segregation has created? It’s literally killing us ... We can’t normalize Black death.”

Before earning her doctorate, she worked as a middle school teacher in Harlem. She has a 22-year old daughter who graduated from Tufts University this spring. As a native of New York City, she was eager for the opportunity to come to Buffalo and explore schools and practices in this part of the state.

“I’d like to spend the year working with students, parents and school leaders,” Watson said. “I think schools have to be the hub of the community. When I was younger, our lives revolved around school. We have to bring that back.”

—Michelle Kearns

Dean’s Lecture Series

2020–21 THEME: EQUITY AND EDUCATION

GSE is committed to creating an equitable, diverse, inclusive and just community where all feel welcomed, included, supported and empowered. It is crucial our communities have equal access to supports, services and opportunities that ensure learning and success.

Invited speakers were selected by a committee of junior faculty who also picked the theme. Their topics reflect a range of perspectives on the theme, representing the various departments within GSE.

Valerie Kinloch.

VALERIE KINLOCH
Renee and Richard Goldman Dean
University of Pittsburgh School of Education

“'The ones we've been waiting for': Race, Justice and Activism in Literacy Education”

In this discussion, she will share some of the literacy stories about race, justice, and activism from various young people, teachers, and community members, and what we can learn from them. How can, and why should, we commit to moving toward justice and understanding the importance of activism in our literacy engagements, in our teaching practices, and in our collaborations with each other? What might this movement look like and in what ways can it contribute to transformative educational spaces and practices? If we are “the ones we’ve been waiting for,” as poet-educator June Jordan writes, then how do we take up critical, humanizing work on race, justice, and activism in literacy education?

Jennifer Morton.

JENNIFER MORTON
Associate Professor of Philosophy
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

“Moving Up Without Losing Your Way”

This talk will address the ethical costs upwardly mobile students must bear if they are to dramatically transform their life circumstances. These costs affect their relationships with family and friends, their sense of cultural identity, and their place in their community. Morton argues they are ethical in so far as they concern those aspects of life that give it value and meaning. Using social science evidence, she will show how these costs are the result of a complex tangle of economic, cultural, and structural factors that unjustly and disproportionately affect disadvantaged students and their communities. She suggests that we need to offer students a new ethical narrative of upward mobility that recognizes and acknowledges these ethical costs. She will conclude with some thoughts on how institutions of higher education might mitigate some of these costs.

John Biewen.

JOHN BIEWEN
Audio Program Director/Instructor and Host of Scene on Radio
documentary podcast of the Center for Documentary Studies
Duke University

“Seeing White”

Just what is going on with white people? Police shootings of unarmed African Americans. Acts of domestic terrorism by white supremacists. The renewed embrace of raw, undisguised white-identity politics. Unending racial inequity in schools, housing, criminal justice, and hiring. Some of this feels new, but in truth it’s an old story.

Why? Where did the notion of “whiteness” come from? What does it mean? What is whiteness for? Scene on Radio host and producer John Biewen will discuss how he, along with an array of leading scholars and regular gues Dr. Chenjerai Kumanyika, took a deep dive into these questions in his fourteen-part documentary series released in 2017.