Alberti Center Early Career Award

The Alberti Center Distinguished Scholarly Contributions to Bullying Abuse Prevention Award, presented annually, recognizes an individual who has made exemplary scholarly contributions to the field of bullying abuse prevention and conducted research that has the potential to influence practice and policy.

Distinguished Scholarly Contributions to Bullying Abuse Prevention
Application Deadline: July 16, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. ET

This award will recognize an individual who has made exemplary scholarly contributions to the field of bullying abuse prevention and conducted research that has the potential to influence practice and policy.

Eligibility

Applications are invited from early career professionals (no more than seven years from receiving doctoral degree) from psychology, education or a related field who work in an accredited college or university setting.

Award

The recipient of this award will receive a plaque and $1,000.

How to Apply

2021 Early Career Award Recipient

This award recognizes Ann Farrell, PhD, an individual who has made exemplary scholarly contributions to the field of bullying abuse prevention and conducted research that has the potential to influence practice and policy.

Portrait of Ann Farrell, PhD.

Biography

Dr. Ann Farrell is an Assistant Professor in Child and Youth Studies at Brock University. Her research centers on a multidisciplinary understanding of bullying as a complex social problem, including the processes among individual, social, environmental, and cultural factors associated with youth bullying.

Specifically, Dr. Farrell’s research focuses on the: (1) joint development of bullying perpetration and individual factors (e.g., antisocial personality traits), (2) interactions among individual, social, and environmental factors that contribute to bullying, and (3) associations between bullying and other forms of violence in the long-term (e.g., indirect aggression, dating violence). Next, she hopes to examine these complex associations in diverse and underrepresented youth populations. By understanding these complexities, Dr. Farrell hopes to learn how to effectively mitigate these factors. Moreover, by building community relationships and participating in knowledge mobilization activities, she aims to integrate research evidence with the everyday experiences of youth to reduce violence and build positive relationships.

Previously, Dr. Farrell was a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow and a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa in Counselling Psychology, Faculty of Education. She also holds a Ph.D. in Psychology (Lifespan Development) and M.A. in Child and Youth Studies from Brock University.